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February 25, 2011

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My Message to the Prime Minister, go and Join the Demonstrations

Kurdishaspect.com - By Dr. Hoshiar Molod

I read in the news that Kurdistan’s prime minister, Dr Barham Saleh, has announced that his door is open to the public and is prepared to listen to their concerns and suggestions. I have no doubt that Dr Saleh’s move is a right step towards solving the problem that faces Kurdistan. He wants to find a mechanism to listen to the demonstrators and solve the problem before it escalators even further. His move encouraged me to write the following few lines to him and his government. 

Dear Sir, 

We all know that the situation in Kurdistan is far from calming down. It started in Sulaimanya and is escalating to the other part of the region very rapidly. Kurdistan Regional Government, KRG, is not capable of offering a sincere resolution to the situation. KRG’s failure is because of the involvement of the two ruling parties in the government’s affairs. The two ruling parties are influencing KRG’s decision to their benefit. 

I know that you are part of the ruling party, but I am also sure that you realize that you have been undermined. 

We all saw when the faculty member and the higher education officials in the university of Sulaimanya, including the higher education minister Dr Delawar Alaadeen and the university head Dr Ali Saeed, joined the demonstrators inside the university to show their understanding of the pain of the people. They told everyone that they are part of the nation and showed solidarity with the youth in Sulaimanya. They were standing tall among the students. 

While in Hawler, and because of the political double standard, they stand powerless when the universities were forced to close down. Or may I say that you are powerless in stopping others to be involved in your government. At the end of the day you should be running the government. 

Students, peshmargas, workers, engineers, doctors, lawyers and everyone else that I didn’t mention are asking for equality and justice. They are not less patriotic than the peshmargas who were fighting the previous regime. They would have been proud of someone like you, if you were to defend their rights. 

People will give credit where credit is due. 

People on the streets of Kurdistan and some lawmakers in the parliament are asking for the government to step down. They are no longer having confident in this government. It is time for the government to step down and end this problem. 

What makes this government different, from the others (i.e. Egypt or Libya) in the Middle East, if it refuses to listen to the people? 

Isn’t that defines the different between democracy and dictatorship? 

We are in pain and dismay for the situation in Kurdistan and we all ask you to step down. 

Then you don’t need to wait for the people to knock on your door to tell you what is their problem. You will be able to join the demonstrators and listen to each and every one of them. 

If you want to listen to the people,

Go and join the demonstrators, they are waiting for you.

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